PREVIOUS RESEARCH

Robotic-assisted locomotor training in people with Multiple Sclerosis

This research uses the Lokomat robotic device as a locomotor training modality for people with multiple sclerosis. 

Principal Investigator:        

Barbara Giesser, M.D.
Department of Neurology, University of California Los Angeles

Related publications:

  1. Geisser BG, Herlihy E, Plummer-D’Amato P, West M, Thomas S, Budovitch A, Pokras N, Guttry M, Regnaux JP, Voskuhl, R, Gold S, & Dobkin B. Locomotor training may improve cognitive performance in persons with multiple sclerosis. American Academy of Neurology. Seattle WA, USA. April 25-May 2, 2009.
  2. Rhodes K*,Plummer-D’Amato P, & Giesser B. Effects of locomotor training and a progressive exercise program on perceived impact of MS using the Multiple Sclerosis Impact Scale. Rosalind Franklin University of Medicine and Science, 4th All School Research Consortium. March 2009.
    (*student co-author)

fMRI studies of stroke locomotor rehabilitation

Serial fMRI studies involving a standardized activation paradigm of voluntary knee extension, ankle dorsiflexion, and ankle plantarflexion of the paretic leg are conducted in people undergoing rehabilitation after stroke to determine whether fMRI can help predict locomotor-related outcomes. 

 Principal investigator:

Bruce H. Dobkin, M.D.

Related publications:

Newton JM, Dong Y, Hidler J, Plummer-D’Amato P, Marehbian J, Albisteguis-Du Bois R, Woods R, Dobkin B.  Reliable assessment of lower limb motor representations with fMRI: Use of an MR compatible device for monitoring torque at ankle, knee and hip joint.  NeuroImage.  2008;43(1):136-46.

Locomotor training in people with stroke

This research examined the effects on overground gait speed of a structured locomotor training program that included use of a treadmill and body weight support system for 36 sessions over 12 weeks for people post stroke.  This pilot study was a precursor to the LEAPS clinical trial.

Related publications:

  1. Plummer-D’Amato P, Behrman AL, Saracino D, Martin J, Fox E, Kautz SA, & Duncan PW. Functionally significant recovery of walking speed after stroke in patients with moderate and severe impairment.  Stroke. 2007;38(2):521.
  2. Plummer P, Behrman AL, Duncan PW, Spigel P, Saracino D, Martin J, Fox, E, Thigpen M, & Kautz, SA.  Effects of stroke severity and training duration on locomotor recovery after stroke: a pilot study. Neurorehabilitation and Neural Repair.  2007;21:137-151.
  3. Martin J, Plummer P, Bowden M, Fulk G, Behrman A.  Body weight support systems: considerations for clinicians.  Physical Therapy Reviews. 2006;11:143-152.

Assessment of unilateral neglect after stroke (doctoral research)

Focus group methodology was used to explore physiotherapists’ understanding of the term ‘unilateral neglect’, knowledge of the different types of unilateral neglect, and procedures used by physiotherapists for the diagnosis and assessment of patients with this condition.  A second study utilized a videotaped case study with a simultaneous think-aloud protocol to investigate in more detail the clinical reasoning of physiotherapists during the assessment of a patient with unilateral neglect following stroke. 

Related publications:

  1. Plummer-D’Amato P, Morris ME, & Denisenko S. Diagnosing unilateral neglect: hypothesis generation and pattern recognition in physiotherapists’ clinical reasoning.  Physiotherapy. 2007;93(S1):S533.
  2. Plummer-D’Amato P, Morris ME, Denisenko S, & Bilney B. A clinical glossary can improve physiotherapists’ characterisation of unilateral neglect.  Physiotherapy. 2007;93(S1):S667.
  3. Plummer P, Morris ME, Hurworth RE, & Dunai J.  How do physiotherapists assess unilateral neglect?  Neurorehabilitation and Neural Repair.  2006;20(1):181. 
  4. Plummer P, Morris ME, Hurworth RE, & Dunai J.  Characterisation of unilateral neglect by physiotherapists.  Disability and Rehabilitation. 2006;28(9):571-577. 
  5. Plummer P, Morris ME, Hurworth RE, & Dunai J.  Physiotherapy assessment of unilateral neglect: Insight into procedures and clinical reasoning.  Physiotherapy.  2006;92:103-109.
  6. Plummer P, Morris ME, Denisenko S, & Dunai J.  Clinical reasoning processes in physiotherapists’ assessment of unilateral neglect: part two. International Journal of Therapy and Rehabilitation.  2005;12:533-541.
  7. Plummer P, Morris ME, Denisenko S, & Dunai J.  Clinical reasoning processes in physiotherapists’ assessment of unilateral neglect: part one. International Journal of Therapy and Rehabilitation.  2005;12:498-504.

Moving visual cues to reduce unilateral neglect after stroke (doctoral research)

A computerized line bisection task was designed to investigate whether the spatial characteristics or general alerting properties of moving visual stimuli are responsible for reducing unilateral neglect on line bisection performance in patients following stroke. Groups comprised right hemisphere stroke patients with left unilateral neglect, age and sex-matched right hemisphere stroke patients without unilateral neglect, age and sex-matched healthy adults. There were 10 subjects in each group. All subjects were administered the Behavioral Inattention Test to determine inclusion. 

Related publications:

  1. Plummer P, Dunai J, & Morris ME. Understanding the effects of moving visual stimuli on unilateral neglect following stroke. Brain and Cognition. 2006;60:156-165.
  2. Plummer P, Morris ME, & Dunai J. The effects of stationary and moving visual cues on line bisection performance in people with unilateral neglect following stroke. 14th International Congress of the World Confederation of Physical Therapy. Barcelona, Spain. June 7-12, 2003.

Mechanisms of covert visual attention (honors research)

A computer-based moving object paradigm was developed to investigate within- and between-object shifts of covert visual attention and the effect of direction of covert attentional shifts on reaction time in ten healthy young adults.  Visual display produced on silicon graphics workstation.  A model 210 Eye Trac monitored eye movements.

Related publications:

Plummer P, Dunai J, & Bennett K.  A rightward attentional bias for shifting covert attention in a moving object paradigm.  Australian Journal of Psychology. 2001;53(supplement):64.

  

SIRROWS (Stroke Inpatient Rehabilitation Reinforcement of Walking Speed)

SIRROWS was a multi-center international randomized clinical trial, sponsored by the World Federation for NeuroRehabilitation. This research investigated the effects of daily reinforcement of walking speed via feedback and encouragement to patients receiving inpatient rehabilitation after stroke on walking speed recovery and length of stay.

Principal Investigator:

Bruce H. Dobkin, M.D.
Department of Neurology, University of California Los Angeles

Co-investigators:

Prudence Plummer-D’Amato, Ph.D.
Department of Physical Therapy, Northeastern University

Valeriy Nenov, Ph.D.
Department of Neurosurgery, University of California Los Angeles

Robert M. Elashoff, Ph.D.
Department of Biomathmatics, University of California Los Angeles

SIRROWS site investigators and the World Federation for NeuroRehabilitation

Related publications:

  1. Dobkin BH, Plummer-D’Amato P, Elashoff R, Lee J, SIRROWS Group. International randomized clinical trial, Stroke Inpatient Rehabilitation with Reinforcement of Walking Speed (SIRROWS), improves outcomes. Neurorehabilitation and Neural Repair. 2010;24(3):235-242.
  2. Dobkin BH, Plummer-D’Amato P. International Stroke Inpatient Rehabilitation Reinforcement of Walking Speed (SIRROWS) Trial. Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. 2009;90(10):e27.
  3. Plummer-D’Amato P, Dobkin BH, Nenov V, & the World Federation for NeuroRehabilitation. Feasibility of collaborative multi-center trials in neurorehabilitation. Neurorehabilitation and Neural Repair. 2008;22(5):627.
  4. Plummer-D’Amato P, Nenov V, Dobkin BH, & the World Federation for NeuroRehabilitation.  Establishing a network for conducting multi-center trials of neurorehabilitation interventions.  Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation.  2007;88(10):e23. 

 

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